The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many organizations to shift to remote work, with employees working from home or other off-site locations. While remote work has many benefits, including increased flexibility and reduced overhead costs, it also poses significant challenges when it comes to cybersecurity. According to new research highlighted by VentureBeat, two-thirds of organizations have suffered security breaches caused by remote work.

The research surveyed over 500 IT leaders in the UK and US and found that 67% of organizations had suffered security incidents related to remote work. The most common causes of these breaches were phishingphishing Phishing is a form of cybercrime in which attackers attempt to deceive individuals into revealing sensitive information, such as login credentials, credit card numbers, or personal details, by posing as a trustworthy entity. Typically, phishing is carried out through email or other electronic communication channels, like instant messaging or social media platforms. attacks, which accounted for 80% of incidents, and employee error, which accounted for 36% of incidents.

One of the biggest challenges with remote work is that it creates new vulnerabilities that cybercriminals can exploit. When employees are working from home or other off-site locations, they may be using unsecured networks or personal devices that lack proper security measures. This makes it easier for cybercriminals to launch phishing attacks or other types of attacks that can compromise sensitive data.

Another challenge with remote work is that it can be difficult for IT teams to monitor and manage security risks. With employees working from various locations and using various devices, it can be challenging to ensure that everyone is adhering to proper security protocols and that all devices and networks are properly secured.

So, what can organizations do to mitigate the risks of remote work? One solution is to provide comprehensive security training to employees, including best practices for using personal devices and securing home networks. Organizations can also invest in technologies like virtual private networks (VPNs) and two-factor authentication2FA 2FA is an acronym that refers to an authentication method used to enhance the security of user accounts and protect sensitive information. It is designed to provide an additional layer of protection beyond just a username and password. Two-Factor Authentication is an authentication method that requires users to provide two separate pieces of evidence or "factors" to verify their identity before granting access to an account or service. These factors usually fall into three categories: something the user knows (e.g., a password), something the user has (e.g., a physical token, smartphone, or security key), and something the user is (e.g., a biometric characteristic like a fingerprint or facial recognition). A common example of 2FA is when a user logs in with their password and then receives a one-time code via text message or an authenticator app, which they must enter to complete the authentication process. (2FA2FA 2FA is an acronym that refers to an authentication method used to enhance the security of user accounts and protect sensitive information. It is designed to provide an additional layer of protection beyond just a username and password. Two-Factor Authentication is an authentication method that requires users to provide two separate pieces of evidence or "factors" to verify their identity before granting access to an account or service. These factors usually fall into three categories: something the user knows (e.g., a password), something the user has (e.g., a physical token, smartphone, or security key), and something the user is (e.g., a biometric characteristic like a fingerprint or facial recognition). A common example of 2FA is when a user logs in with their password and then receives a one-time code via text message or an authenticator app, which they must enter to complete the authentication process.) to enhance the security of remote connections.

Remote work has become a new reality for many organizations, but it also presents significant challenges when it comes to cybersecurity. As the new research from Egress highlights, two-thirds of organizations have suffered breaches caused by remote work. By taking proactive steps to mitigate these risks, such as providing comprehensive security training and investing in advanced security technologies, organizations can better protect their sensitive data and avoid the consequences of a security breach.